Word Padding for July Camp Or Anytime

It’s less than 48 hours to the deadline and you still have 5,000 words to write?

screaming-146426__180Don’t give in! This is still doable even if you don’t have much time to devote.

Here are some totally legal dirty tricks for adding words to any of your NaNo projects. Listen, learn, and put them into practice. There’s no shame in word padding for NaNo, it is, in fact, part of the game and might spark a new plot twist. ūüėÄ

A simple trick to get all of these in in a short amount of time will be at the end so keep reading.

  1. Give your characters long names, at least three to five words long. So Aidan becomes Aidan Edward Vincent St. Thomas. Donna becomes Donna Margaret Esther Louise Franklin. Pretty simple way of increasing by a LOT of words.
  2. Better still, add a title, Supreme Cat Carrier, Overpaid Overlord, Desk Jockey. So now, Freddie becomes Overpaid Desk Jockey Overlord Fredric Michael Benjamin Lane Peterson.
  3. Deconstruct contractions. Every¬†don’t¬†becomes¬†do not,¬†every¬†wouldn’t,¬†would not,¬†etc. Again, very simple with the trick below.
  4. Lists of words using “and” rather than commas also works. Add a grocery list; bananas and potatoes and hamburger and hamburger helper and bacon and brie cheese and kumquats and pistachios and Bernsteins delicious ice cream treats of wonderment.
  5. Long insults – Have you FMC hurl a lot of uncomplimentary words at the hero. Is she mad at him? She can call him a¬†smelly pile of unwashed socks that sat too long in the bottom of the laundry basket in a summer rain on a hot day. That was 24 words right there. It’s a great way to get some of your own freewriting therapy and add a couple of handsful of words.Purple Prose cat
  6. Add poetry, song lyrics, a short story within your story, description of your desk or your stuffed animal mascot, or favorite quotes. Have a character who loves to spout quotes and insert them at random points in the story. Do the characters ignore him or ponder the wisdom? More words!
  7. Go for the Purple Prose. Add as much flowery description as possible. The morning sun didn’t just hit the fence, it¬†caressed it with the passionate and loving touch of a Bond villain petting his Persian as he pondered.¬†

Some of these techniques have even sparked further plot. Don’t discount them as just a cheat. Freewriting in itself is invaluable for simply breaking through a writer’s block.

Now for that simple trick – Find and Replace. For the names, use Find and Replace make
every¬†Freddie¬†become¬†Overpaid Desk Jockey Overlord Fredric Michael Benjamin Lane Peterson. So much easier than scrolling through. Use it for the deconstructed contractions too. Find¬†won’t, replace with¬†will not.¬†Find and Replace does the tedious work and you’ve just doubled your word count. Okay, maybe not doubled but given it a good boost. You can do it with the insults too. Come up with a list for each expletive and use Find/Replace.

I think you get the idea and I’m betting that’ll add a good chunk to your project and get you to the Winner’s Circle, a.k.a.¬†The Illustrious Winner’s Circle of Creative and Powerful Wordacity. ūüėȬ†

Happy writing and on to victory! Writing_Poster.jpg.scaled500

Taps – CampNaNoWriMo July 2015

bugle

Another camp over.
We wrote, edited, plotted and outlined.
Words were added, others delete.
At times it was exhilarating, other times it was gruesome, still other times it was tedious.
It’s a process. That’s how it goes.
Glory in it!
Revel in it!
Embrace it.
It is what it is.
And what it is is the very best of you.
You ARE a writer.

Off To Camp – July 2015 CampNaNoWriMo

(aka Campy Campy Camp Camp)

And so we meet again. Me, the de facto camp counselor and you, the intrepid Warm Weather Warriors of cabin-768716_640Wordsmithiness (I can’t help it, I LOVE unnecessary alliteration [I wanted to go with gratuitous but it didn’t alliterate as nicely]).

As we step forth and prepare for another month of crazed creativity it’s good to look back at our past.

What did we learn in April? Did we exceed our expectations or did we expect too much? Did we find brilliant ways to express our story or were we frustrated with limiting words?

Did we fly? Or did we fall?

Allow me to answer that for you (trust me, I’m a¬† professional*).

You flew!¬†(Does flew look weird to anyone else? It’s right, I checked. Okay, moving on…)

YOU FLEW! I know you don’t think you did, but you did! You FLEW like a crazy Bird of Words. Remember, if you added anything at all, you did something. And something really and truthfully is better than nothing. It’s not just an overused saying. And seriously, I’m not just saying this to placate, enable, or patronize you.

YOU flew.FlashBuddy bald-eagle-521492_640

Writing is surprisingly difficult. Do you know how many stories have wandered through my head that were never written down? (You probably do, you’ve had them too.) So you know how hard it is to put pen to paper, fingers to keyboard, thumbs to phone. And then, if you manage that, you sit and tap your fingers, not writing, just tapping a surface, all words having fled the mind. Frustrated, you slap your hands on the table and get up and actually clean the house (we all do it, my house is never tidy, but in November things get put away – it’s weird). You stalk to the kitchen to do dishes or eat your frustrations (disguised as Oreos and Cheetos) then pace back to your chair.

Eventually you start with anything that pops in to your head (it might be the Cheetos/Oreos combination talking, but go with it).

A sentence or two is written. You’ve done it! It flows.

People who don’t write do not get it. They assume it’s so easy. How hard can it be? they mock. But they don’t know. They don’t understand how hard it is. You pour yourself out and hope that someone loves it as much as you.ClkerFreeVectorImages proud figure-25590_640

And you did that. You boldly got those words out of your head.

I’m so proud of you. :’-D

So as we move into July’s camp just remember

If you flew once, you can do it again. ūüėÄ

*Hehehe A professional what? (Okay,¬†I am actually a Life/Nutrition Coach among other things. I’m sure this falls under the life coaching aspect.)

The Eternal Question

Plotters ask questions first. They outline, they plan, they process. Plotters have there, um,notes stuff together and know where they’re headed. They surround themselves with filled notebooks¬†then write. Give or take a bit here and there.

Pantsers are the opposite. They write almost as if they’re the reader, just as surprised by characters’ antics. There is no plan, no outline, no idea where they’re headed. They just write and maybe ask questions later.

My name is Pacifika and I’m a pantser – to the core.typer-584696_640

I’m finding that my difficulty with pantsing is that novels are huge, unwieldy things that are far more difficult to edit than were my collage essays.

The Holly Lisle* Flash Fiction program has you come up with lists of ideas to begin. Pretty cool, but I had a hard time writing from them. Turns out it’s the way my brain works. Once I’ve put it on paper, I’m done with it. It’s old and I’ve lost interest – time to move on to something new. But I can bang out an awesome little flash fiction piece in my pantser way.

The question was, How will I get better? How will I learn to organize better, make my stories tighter, if I don’t adopt some plotter techniques.

The answer came to me at random. (Yea! for my random brain.) I won’t totally bore you with the details, I’ll just say, in my youth, I began writing first and outlining after. (Shh, don’t tell Ms. Bell. She’ll flip.) Total pantser behavior.

Now it’s just a matter of reversing the plotter process. Write first, ask¬†questions later. My next steps will be taking what I’ve learned and going over my stories. (Ugh! Yes, it means I have to go over what I’ve already done, put off the new and exciting, but I actually love my stories. My passion shows up in my pantsing as opposed to when I tried to plot.) (Hmm, that didn’t sound awkward at all)

image

Are you a pantser or a planner? Have you ever tried to do the opposite? How did it turn out?

*If you haven’t done it yet, check out Holly Lisle’s writing lessons. She has at least one free and it’s a great place to start. Also check your library’s online list of digital resources for access to Gale University for any writing classes by Steve Alcorn. They are in-depth for helping you work out why you write and what to write.

Whoooooo Aaaaarrrre Yoooouuuu?

CheshireCat

(Yes, Cheshire cat is Horrifying but I had to credit the quote, my title. And this one was less frightening than the others.)

Sit down.
You heard me, sit.
I’ve got startling news for you, and you’re going to wish you were sitting if you don’t.

Okay, now take a deep breath.
No, deeper than that.
Come on, suck that oxygen in, cuz you’re going to need it for your brain to take in what I’m about to say.
Now take two more.
Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.
Oooooooouuuuuut.
Iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin.
Oooooooouuuuuut.

YOU are a writer.
Oh yeah, that’s right. I’ll say it again in a little different way.
You ARE a writer.
Once more.
You are a WRITER.

Are you with me so far?
I know the doubt. I’ve had it too. It comes about, slinking in when you’re not looking, like the neighbor cat. It curls up on the rug in front of your mental fireplace and you think “How cute.” Then when you’re not looking it scratches the furniture, shreds your certainty. Darn neighbor cat.

Okay, You and I, writers.
You know what convinced me?
A quote that I can’t find. I looked. I found some other, wonderful and inspiring quotes but not the one I was looking for. Ah, the internet Rabbit Hole and the difficulty of modern research. LOL

Take this one instead

. Real Writer

Got it? Do you see what I’m saying now?

You are a writer. ūüėÄ Now WRITE! (or edit if that’s what you’re doing for CampNaNoWrimo.)

Remember, if you are doing CampNaNoWriMo.org this April, nanomail Pacifika and ask for an invitation to our local SpokaNano cabin. See you all at the lake.

To Journal or not to Journal Part 1

journalBlah, blah, blah journal.

That was my view. But I kept hearing that it was really good for the brain and sorting mental and emotional clutter. Basically a big bucket you can dump all of the random garbage that blathers in your head. (Or am I the only one with that problem?)

And of course it’s “so important” for writers, so I decided to try.

You’d think it would be intuitive but I need to know what the rules are before I do something so I got online and took a class*.

I was surprised that there are a lot of different types of journaling and different exercises. It’s not just “sit down, bare your soul on paper, hope no one reads it.” You can do a Gratitude Journal (useful for accentuating the positive in your life), lists (great for clarifying), unsent letters (excellent way of giving your older siblings “what for” without hurting their feelings or getting your butt kicked). There are others and all have different outcomes and uses.

You may have heard of Julia Cameron and her book The Artists Way. (Don’t panic! journalcatYou, as a writer are an artist, but don’t let that stop you. Deep breath. You don’t have to be a hoity-toity “artiste.”) She suggests “morning pages” which is just free writing three pages first thing in the morning. Just babble and that’s it.

I did a technique called “Dialogues” and it was an enlightening experience which I’ll make you sit through in another post. Mwahahaha.

Have you journaled? How long have you done it? Has it helped you quiet the brain and focus?

* Spokane County Library District (scld.org) is partnered with Gale University to give its patrons an astoundingly wide variety of free and awesome classes. Check them out when you have a moment.

Happy April First!

Ah, spring, when a girl’s mind turns to car maintenance.

I want to share with you the fine art of changing the oil. Pay very close attention as these steps are critical to the proper function of your vehicle.

1. Go to a reputable oil change business; local or chain works.

2. Pay them to do the job.

3. Do not let them talk you into paying them to change your blinker fluid or the muffler bearings. You can do those yourself.

(I just couldn’t put up¬†the truly serious and important bits¬†on April Fool’s Day so look at the previous (yesterdays) post for the real one.)

jester

Remember, if you are doing CampNaNoWriMo this April, nanomail Pacifika and ask for an invitation to our local SpokaNano cabin. See you all at the lake.

(Happy Campers are we, having fun ‘neath the trees…)